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breast care a reality

Schedule your low-dose mammogram. Do it for you.

 

Did you know that mammograms can spot tumors up to two years before you can feel them? Or that when detected early, the five-year survival rate for breast cancer is 98 percent?¹


So why – despite these facts – did only half of U.S. women ages 40 and older get an annual mammogram last year?²

 

Some popular reasons:

 

  • “I’m concerned it will hurt.”
  • “I’m worried about radiation.”
  • “Breast cancer doesn’t run in my family.”
  • “I don’t want to get bad news.”
  • “I’m just too busy.”

 

No matter why you’ve put off getting your mammogram, there’s a reason to move this potentially life-saving exam right to the top of your to-do list – the MicroDose Mammography system from Philips.


Browsing through this portal webpage, you will get the answers to the questions you might have regarding your mammography examination and MicroDose Mammography. Learn all about what to expect and how to prepare for your first time as well as the potential results.

See a MicroDose Mammography examination.

 

Read what recent study results have shown about how women make mammography decisions.

 

Download case study

What is MicroDose Mammography?

 

MicroDose Mammography is a type of X-ray machine for low-dose mammography used in more than 24 countries worldwide. It uses a unique technique called photon counting, based on research at the CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden. This provides excellent quality images at low dose and offers several benefits for a woman undergoing mammography. It was designed in close collaboration with both clinical staff and patients to provide high ergonomics.

What is a screening mammogram?

 

A screening mammogram is a breast X-ray examination for women with no symptoms. The purpose is to detect rumors while they are too small to be felt by a woman or her doctor...

 

Read more

 

How to perform a breast self-examination

 

About 25-35% of breast cancers are found by the patient, so reporting symptoms to your doctor is smart. However, a breast self-examination does not replace your screening mammogram, which will detect tiny lumps long before they can be felt.

 

To examine your breasts, you can use the step-by-step breast self-examination technique described here. Women with breast implants can also do the examination. Ask your surgeon to help you identify the implant’s edges so you know exactly what you are feeling.

 

You should examine your breasts every month, preferably a few days after your period ends to allow any swelling or tenderness to subside. If you are not menstruating, it is important to do the examination on the same day each month.

 

It is essential that you get to know the look and feel of your breasts, and that you tell your doctor about any changes you notice. However, remember that a change in your breast is not necessarily an indication of cancer.

 

The use of Philips MicroDose mammography SI system with Spectral Breast Density Measurement, means your screening mammogram will be quick, targeted, and at a low radiation dose.

Step 1: begin by looking at...

Step 1 – Begin by looking at your breasts in the mirror

 

You should check that your breasts are:

 

  • their usual size, shape and color
  • evenly shaped, without visible distortion or swellin

 

If you see any of the following changes, tell your doctor:

 

  • dimpling, puckering, or bulging of the skin
  • a nipple that has changed position, or an inverted nipple
  • redness, soreness, rash, or swelling
Step 2: now raise your arms

Step 2 – Now raise your arms

 

And look for the same changes, gently squeeze each nipple and check for discharge.

Step 3a: Circular motion

Step 3 – Next, feel your breasts while lying down

 

Using your right hand to feel your left breast, and then your left hand to feel your right breast. Use a firm, smooth touch with the middle three fingers of your hand, keeping the fingers flat and together.

Cover the entire breast —from your collarbone to the top of your abdomen, and from your armpit to your cleavage. Follow a pattern to be sure that you cover the whole breast.

 

3a. Circular motion

Circular motion: begin at the nipple, moving in increasing circles.

 

Step 3b: Linear motion

Step 3 – Next, feel your breasts while lying down

 

Using your right hand to feel your left breast, and then your left hand to feel your right breast. Use a firm, smooth touch with the middle three fingers of your hand, keeping the fingers flat and together. Cover the entire breast —from your collarbone to the top of your abdomen, and from your armpit to your cleavage. Follow a pattern to be sure that you cover the whole breast.

 

3b. Linear motion

Linear motion: move your fingers up and down vertically in a pattern of rows. Use a soft touch for tissue just beneath the skin, and a firmer touch for deeper tissue. Begin examining each area with a very soft touch, then increase the pressure so that you can feel the deeper tissue, down to your ribcage.


 

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